About Us Committed to Transparency,
Driven by Innovation

About Us



FAIR Health is an independent nonprofit that collects data for and manages the nation’s largest database of privately billed health insurance claims and is entrusted with Medicare Parts A, B and D claims data for 2013 to the present. We are known both for our commitment to transparency and for making actionable data available in innovative ways to all stakeholders in the healthcare community.

Created with the real-world needs of users in mind, our data products, tools and educational information support laws and regulations, catalyze business decisions, inform claims adjudication, fuel research, shape healthcare policy and meet the day-to-day cost-estimation needs of healthcare consumers.

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Mission and Origins

Mission and Origins



FAIR Health was established to bring transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information. A conflict-free, nonprofit organization that qualifies as a public charity under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, FAIR Health is charged with maintaining and making available trusted claims data resources that are used to promote sound decision making by all participants in the healthcare system.

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Board of Directors

Reflecting the healthcare community we serve, our Board of Directors comprises leaders in medicine, healthcare policy, law, consumer advocacy, health insurance, education, health systems research and business. Mindful of our mission, they provide expertise and guidance to support the development of our data assets and products and guide the evolution of FAIR Health as the healthcare environment changes. The Board serves without compensation and meets quarterly.

Sara Rosenbaum (Chair)

Those who specialize in civil rights have been extremely active around passage and implementation of the ACA because it is self-evident that gains for low-income Americans are, in effect, gains for minority Americans in the US. The ACA, of course, makes a seminal contribution to the problem. The Kaiser Family Foundation just published a study showing the disproportionately large impact of the Act on minority Americans, who are much more likely to be uninsured. To the extent that a central purpose of the Act is to create more equal access, its benefits for minority Americans should be seen as one of the greatest civil rights achievements of our time.

Full Biography

Chiquita Brooks-LaSure

I had been interested in medicine, but much more interested in a number of issues related to policy and social justice. When I was studying public policy as a graduate student at Georgetown University, I took a class with Judy Feder and became very interested in health policy. As I learned about the complexity of healthcare in that class, I became interested in pursuing a career in health policy with the government, particularly in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). When both of those aligned—i.e., getting a job that focused on health policy at the OMB—it seemed like a perfect fit. Once you get involved in health policy, you realize it’s a field where you can spend decades and still discover new issues to learn about. It is so complex, and there are so many different lenses, that you can be an expert in Medicaid and still have plenty to learn about the Medicare program. Likewise, you can know what is happening at the state level but not so much at the federal level, and vice versa. Once I started on the health policy path, I knew that it was the path for me.

Full Biography

Zachary W.Carter

Zachary W. Carter retired in 2019 as Corporation Counsel of New York City. During his tenure, he resolved long-standing litigation, ushering in a new era of equity and justice for the city. Memorable settlements range from the overuse of stop and frisk and the Central Park Five case to excessive uses of force at Rikers Island and the underrepresentation of racial minorities in the ranks of the Fire Department of the City of New York. Previously, Mr. Carter was the head of the New York Trial Department and Co-Chair of the White Collar Crime and Civil Fraud practice at Dorsey & Whitney LLP. He practiced in the areas of white collar criminal defense, complex civil litigation, representation of government-regulated industries, representation of government contractors, corporate governance and compliance, and securities class action litigation. Prior to joining Dorsey & Whitney as a partner, Mr. Carter served as the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York. Mr. Carter is a member of the Board of Trustees at New York University School of Law. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Cablevision, Hale House, VERA Institute of Justice and Prisoners’ Legal Services.

Lawrence Casalino

I realized that I wanted a career that would allow me to help people directly, one-on-one, and see the results of my work. That’s why I decided to pursue a career in medicine. I was in private practice as a physician for 20 years, and I enjoyed meeting a wide variety of people every day, getting to know them and helping them. In that sense, medicine is a very rewarding career. At the same time, I had always known that I wanted to pursue intellectual and policy-related work. After 11 or 12 years in medical practice, I cut my work hours from about 65 to 50 hours a week in order to pursue a Master of Public Health degree. Later I received a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. My experience as a family physician has influenced my research interests a great deal; that’s obvious from the work I’ve done. Having worked as a physician in the community, I have a sense of the way physicians in this country think about issues.

Full Biography

Sherry Glied

I’m actually one of the few people who think that employer-sponsored coverage is a strong institution and is not likely to disappear any time soon. It offers many advantages even compared with the health insurance exchanges. There is a good reason, especially in very large companies, to retain employer-sponsored health insurance, but I can see it fading out among the smaller firms over time. Employers are pretty innovative, so we will continue to see changes in the way employer-sponsored coverage operates. We don’t entirely know what those trends are going to be yet and I am not enthusiastic about predicting, so we’ll see.

Full Biography

Christopher F. Koller

As a society, we need to consider the role of price transparency as opposed to charge transparency, and the role of public organizations, trusted community-wide efforts, national nonprofit resources like FAIR Health and private initiatives in making that price information more readily accessible to different stakeholders—consumers, providers, researchers and others.

Full Biography

Lynn B. Nicholas

Lynn B. Nicholas, LFACHE, has had a career of over 40 years working in and representing hospitals and health systems in New Jersey, Louisiana and Massachusetts, most recently leading the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association (MHA). Not only was Ms. Nicholas in demand across the state and nation to offer her perspective on various healthcare issues, most notably payment reform and delivery system transformation, she was a strong proponent of public health and wellness. Under her leadership, MHA and Ms. Nicholas personally received numerous recognitions for work on tobacco use cessation and curbing opioid and substance use disorder, and were recognized five years as a Healthiest Small Employer in greater Boston. She spearheaded “Behavioral Health—the Unfinished Agenda of Reform” in an effort to improve behavioral health access and quality across the continuum of care. A former American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) Regent and Governor, Ms. Nicholas received the Early Careerist and Senior Healthcare Executive Regents awards, and an ACHE Early Careerist Travel Scholarship was established in her honor.

Nancy Nielsen

Nothing has been more rewarding than taking care of patients and sharing their lives—that was a real privilege and I feel very fortunate to have had that opportunity. The greatest privilege in terms of my professional career, though, was leading the AMA at a time when there was clearly an opportunity to move toward health insurance for all Americans.

Full Biography

Robert Parke

Fortuitous events, more than anything else, led me to become involved in healthcare. I completed my actuarial exams in South Africa where, at the time, there was not much actuarial involvement in healthcare. I was working for one of the large South African life insurance companies that also owned what was called a “medical aid society”—essentially a not-for-profit health plan. South Africa is very similar to the United States in terms of having a predominantly private health insurance market. My company and other life insurance companies became more involved in healthcare as a result of changes in regulation. I continued in the healthcare sector because it was, to me, much more dynamic than the more traditional actuarial fields of life insurance or pensions. It seemed to be more directly relevant to individuals; there were multiple stakeholders and numerous issues to address.
A few years later, when I moved to the United Kingdom (UK), some of the actuarial consulting firms were starting private health insurance practices. Given my background, I was hired by Milliman’s affiliate in the UK as it was starting to develop a healthcare actuarial practice. While in the UK, I met my wife, who is American, and we later moved to the United States. Health actuarial work in the United States is incredibly diverse and over the years I have been fortunate to be involved in what has always seemed to be an important national discussion.

Full Biography

James Roosevelt, Jr.

As a volunteer hospital board member, healthcare lawyer and health plan executive, I have had the opportunity to work on all sides of the healthcare world. That experience has taught me the importance of good, impartial data. My community activism and government service have shown me how access to information improves people's lives. The chance to work with an organization that focuses on accuracy, value and fairness in healthcare payment is a rare coalescing of personal background and professional goals. I look forward to supporting that work and raising its profile.

Full Biography

Stephen A. Warnke, Esq.

What drew me to the healthcare bar was that it’s an area of private practice in which I, as a lawyer, can be intimately involved in matters of pressing policy significance, representing private clients but doing so in a way that advances the public good. The healthcare industry is in a state of perpetual flux and perpetual crisis, so there is never a moment when you can profess to have complete command of all the technical details. The challenge for lawyers who represent healthcare clients is therefore constantly evolving, and, of course, always fascinating.

Full Biography

Executive Management Team

The FAIR Health management team has extensive knowledge and experience in healthcare policy, information technology, data management, insurance, finance and law. They apply their collective talents and expertise to the organization’s primary goals: bringing fairness and transparency to healthcare cost information, and making that information available in products and tools that simplify its use and maximize its value for as many stakeholders as possible.

Policy Advisor

FAIR Health’s Policy Advisor draws on his broad clinical and research experience to help inform our research and policy-related initiatives. He assists FAIR Health in designing research to help study disease and public health as well as shed light on the healthcare system. He also advises on public policy and consults on FAIR Health’s activities, including our role in advancing transparency to the benefit of consumers and other stakeholders.

Martin Makary, MD, MPH
Professor of Health Policy and Management
Johns Hopkins University

Full Biography

Academic Advisory Board

Representing diverse areas of the healthcare research community, FAIR Health’s Academic Advisory Board enhances FAIR Health’s mission to contribute to public knowledge. The Advisory Board advances the research potential of our data, which both support the work of academics, policy makers and clinical researchers and form the basis of our own widely disseminated studies. Among the activities of the Advisory Board are identifying potential areas of exploration for FAIR Health’s white papers and reviewing the studies prior to release.

Helen Levy, PhD
Research Professor, Institute for Social Research, Ford School of Public Policy and School of Public Health
University of Michigan

Full Biography

J. Michael McWilliams, MD, PhD
Professor of Health Care Policy and Medicine
Harvard Medical School

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Rachel Werner, MD, PhD
Robert D. Eilers Professor of Health Care Management, Wharton School
Professor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

Full Biography

Official Data Source



Official Data Source

FAIR Health’s rich data repository and independence make us a valued resource for federal and state government agencies seeking reliable, objective data. The data serve a variety of purposes, from rate setting and economic studies to clinical analyses and population health research. Governmental uses of FAIR Health data include support of policy making, legislative initiatives, healthcare research, public health, insurance regulation, dispute resolution and consumer education. Our data are incorporated in statutes and regulations around the country and serve as the official data source for many state health programs.

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Thought Leadership



Thought Leadership

We employ our data—and apply our experience—to advance the national conversations on cost transparency, policy, health insurance literacy, clinical issues and more. FAIR Health conducts surveys and publishes original articles, white papers, infographics and analyses that feature findings from our database, many of which appear in prominent industry publications and media outlets.

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Grant-Funded Initiatives



Grant-Funded Initiatives

In keeping with our mission of bringing transparency to healthcare costs and insurance information, FAIR Health partners with prominent national and regional organizations on programs designed to improve health insurance literacy and decision making, and to promote groundbreaking research.

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